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The Best Budget Running Shoes Of 2022

Adidas Adizero Adios 6
The Adidas Adizero Adios 6 is a great running shoe if you’re on a budget (Image credit: Nick Harris-Fry / Future)

One of the great attractions of running has always been that it doesn’t require expensive equipment or a monthly membership. You would be forgiven, however, for calling BS on that statement, because the cost of any brand’s new, flagship running shoes can be well above £100 and frequently top £150.

If you’re someone who wants the best of everything the minute it comes out, there’s no getting around it – you’ll need to splurge to get the running shoes you want. Thankfully a good pair will usually last for more than 800km and the materials used in some of the top-line shoes offer some impressive benefits. If you’re on a budget, don’t worry – there are also a number of ways to get a great pair of running shoes that won’t break the bank.

The best strategy is to seek out an older model of a shoe. Often the differences between the latest release and last season’s model might only be cosmetic, but the price will be significantly lower. We always flag in our reviews when the differences between generations are minimal. By searching brands’ websites and third-party retailers you’ll be able to find a top shoe for a song. 

Another option is to seek out a budget shoe. This can be a bit of a crapshoot, but if you stick to the “does it feel right” test when trying it on, you should be able to find one that works for you.

The other option is to wait for Black Friday, or another big sales period. If you have the patience and aren’t in need of a set of kicks immediately, this can be your best bet for finding great shoes at a knockdown price.

The shoes that are discounted in the sales can vary, so if you’re not sure what to look for then check out our guide to the best running shoes first and then go hunting for deals on the ones that catch your eye. We’ll also be collating some of the best deals on running shoes here, so you can save time searching yourself.

The Best Budget Running Shoes

Reebok Floatride Energy 4

(Image credit: Nick Harris-Fry / Future)
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Best budget daily trainer

Specifications

RRP: $110 / £75
Type: Neutral training shoe

Reasons to buy

+
Great price and often reduced
+
Versatile ride
+
Light

Reasons to avoid

-
Not the fastest option for racing
-
Some might like a softer ride

The Floatride Energy line of shoes has been a go-to option for savvy runners in recent years, and the latest version of the shoe is a considerable upgrade on the third version. Lighter and more versatile, the Floatride Energy 4 is still comfortable enough for easy runs but also snappy enough for speed and tempo sessions, making it a great daily training option. It’s also frequently reduced from its already-low RRP – look out for codes on the Reebok site you can use to bring the price down. 

Read more in our Floatride Energy 4 review


Puma Velocity Nitro 2

(Image credit: Nick Harris-Fry / Future)
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Best-value running shoe

Specifications

RRP: $120 / £100
Type: Neutral training shoe

Reasons to buy

+
Bouncy, comfortable midsole
+
Outsole grip is excellent
+
Versatile

Reasons to avoid

-
Not as stable as other shoes
-
Upper can make your foot hot

Even though there are cheaper shoes on this list, we urge you to consider the Velocity Nitro 2, because it’s fantastic value at its RRP. It’s a great all-rounder running shoe with an enjoyable, bouncy ride that’s great for cruising through easy runs or picking up the pace in your fast training sessions. It also has an excellent outsole and can be used as a road-to-trail shoe on lighter off-road tracks, and it lasts a long time too.

Read more in our Puma Velocity Nitro 2 review


Adidas Adizero Adios 6

(Image credit: Nick Harris-Fry / Future)
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A speedy shoe that’s going for a song

Specifications

RRP: $120 / £110
Type: Neutral speed shoe

Reasons to buy

+
Fast
+
Relatively low price
+
Stable, traditional ride

Reasons to avoid

-
Hard on the legs
-
Outsole can pick up small stones

The Adidas Adios used to be the best marathon racing shoe in the world, and although it has now been superseded by high-stack carbon super-shoes (including Adidas’s Adios Pro line), the shoe is always worth considering if you’re looking for a speedy trainer with a firmer, more grounded feel. The Adios 7 has recently come out which means the Adios 6 is now popping up in lots of sales, and it’s dropped to £59 on Sports Shoes (opens in new tab) with a range of colours available.

Read more in our Adidas Adizero Adios 6 review


Saucony Endorphin Speed 2 running shoes

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The best all-round running shoe is now in the sales

Specifications

RRP: $160 / £155
Type: Neutral all-rounder

Reasons to buy

+
Smooth and efficient ride
+
Almost as fast as a carbon shoe
+
Comfortable enough for easy runs

Reasons to avoid

-
Outsole can slip on slick surfaces

The Saucony Endorphin Speed 3 launched recently and has made some updates on the Speed 2, notably a wider, more stable design. However, if you’re a neutral runner without any stability concerns the previous version of the shoe is just as good, if not better, since it’s lighter and the narrow design might fit your foot better. The key to the Speed’s appeal is its versatility: it’s comfortable enough for easy runs, but the nylon plate in the midsole makes it almost as fast as a carbon super-shoe when racing or doing fast training. The Speed 2 is reduced to £110 in a choice of colours in both men’s and women’s versions (with one colour at £93) at Pro:Direct Running (opens in new tab).

Read more in our Saucony Endorphin Speed 2 review


Run Flyknit 2

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A stable neutral shoe that lasts forever

Specifications

RRP: $160 / £140
Type: Cushioned stable neutral shoe

Reasons to buy

+
Smooth and stable ride
+
Highly durable
+
Improved upper lockdown

Reasons to avoid

-
Fairly firm and dull ride
-
Not great for speedwork

The Infinity Run 3 has just come out and is, to all intents and purposes, the same as the Infinity Run 2, so grabbing a deal on the older shoe is the smart move. The Infinity Run 2 is reduced to $77.97 on the Nike US site (opens in new tab), and if you shop around you’ll generally be able to find it in a sale somewhere, wherever you are in the world. It is a stable neutral shoe, which means a neutral shoe with added support features like the large plastic heel clip and wide base. The Infinity Run has a smooth, rockered ride that’s best for easy runs, and is one of the longer-lasting shoes on the market thanks to the durable React foam midsole.

Read more in our Nike React Infinity Run Flyknit 2 review


Kalenji Run Cushion budget running trainers

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Kalenji Run Cushion

Best running shoe under $50/£50

Specifications

RRP: $29.99 / £19.99
Type: Neutral training shoe

Reasons to buy

+
Very cheap
+
Comfortable

Reasons to avoid

-
Only suitable for short distances

If you’re looking for exceptionally cheap running shoes without wanting to faff around with sales then Decathlon own-brand Kalenji is worth checking out, with several options under $50 in the US and £50 in the UK. This pair are well under those marks and are suited to two or three 5Ks a week on the road or treadmill.


Higher State budget trail-running shoes

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Higher State Soil Shaker 2

Best budget trail-running shoe

Specifications

RRP: $107.19 / £79.99
Type: Trail-running shoe

Reasons to buy

+
Great grip on soft ground
+
Lighter than first version
+
Always reduced from RRP

Reasons to avoid

-
Not very comfortable on harder trails

A genuine bargain for runners who spend a lot of time ploughing through the mud on wet trails, the Soil Shaker 2 is always available for a lot less than its £79.99 RRP, and has deep 8mm lugs for gripping boggy ground. The second version of the Soil Shaker is considerably lighter than the original, a welcome change that makes it more enjoyable to use in thick mud when your feet already feel heavy.


More About Running Shoes

Nick Harris-Fry
Nick Harris-Fry

Nick Harris-Fry is a journalist who has been covering health and fitness since 2015. Nick is an avid runner, covering 70-110km a week, which gives him ample opportunity to test a wide range of running shoes and running gear. He is also the chief tester for fitness trackers and running watches, treadmills and exercise bikes, and workout headphones.