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The Best Stability Running Shoes For Overpronation

Saucony Guide 14 stability running shoe
The Saucony Guide is one of the best stability running shoes (Image credit: Saucony)

If you’re a new runner, or an experienced pavement-pounder with a worrying habit of picking up injuries, getting your gait checked is definitely something worth doing.

Most running shops will do a basic gait analysis for free and this will provide some insight into the best running shoes for you. For example, if gait analysis shows that you overpronate when running – your foot rolls excessively inwards when landing – then a stability shoe could well be your best bet.

Overpronation means that your body doesn’t absorb the impact of running as effectively as it could and this can be a contributory factor to developing injuries. Stability shoes have reinforced sections on the arch side of the shoe which are designed to distribute the impact of running evenly.

Almost all running shoe brands offer stability shoes alongside their neutral models, with differing levels of support available depending on how much you overpronate. If you are a severe overpronator you might need a motion control shoe, which offers more support than even a stability shoe, but is heavier and more rigid as a result, which can make it less comfortable to run in.

If you are in need of some extra support when running, here are our top stability shoe picks.


Brooks Adrenaline GTS 22 stability running shoe

(Image credit: Brooks)
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Brooks Adrenaline GTS 22

Most comfortable stability shoe

Specifications

RRP: £130
Weight: 289g (UK 8)
Stack: 36mm heel, 24mm forefoot
Drop: 12mm

Reasons to buy

+
New softer midsole
+
Natural feel with added stability
+
Good for neutral runners too

Reasons to avoid

-
A bit bulky for speedwork

The Adrenaline has been popular with overpronators for more than two decades, and the latest version of the shoe is likely to persuade more people to try it. That’s because it maintains its stability features while increasing the softness of the midsole, which is now made entirely of Brooks’s plush DNA Loft foam. The GuideRails on either side of the back of the shoe support you through your footstrike, and whether you land on your heel or forefoot the Adrenaline 22 has a smooth transition that works well for a range of runs.

Buy men’s from Brooks (opens in new tab) | Buy women’s from Brooks (opens in new tab) | £130


Saucony Guide 15

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Saucony Guide 15

A versatile shoe with some stability features

Specifications

RRP : £130
Weight: 285g (UK 8.5)
Stack: 35mm heel, 27mm forefoot
Drop: 8mm

Reasons to buy

+
Versatile ride for easy and speedy runs
+
Light for a stability shoe
+
Works for neutral runners too

Reasons to avoid

-
Might not have enough stability for some

Saucony made significant changes to the Guide for the 15th edition of the popular stability shoe, increasing the midsole stack height and making the foam a little softer while also managing to reduce the weight. The stability elements have also been updated, with the new Hollow-Tech medial element providing unobtrusive support on the run without adding too much weight. The result is a comfortable and versatile shoe that’s lighter overall than most stability options and that neutral runners will also enjoy using for daily training. 

Buy men’s from Saucony (opens in new tab) | Buy women’s from Saucony (opens in new tab) | £130


Buying Guides

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On Cloudflyer

A firmer stability option with a stylish design

Specifications

RRP: £140
Weight: 291g (UK 9)
Stack: Not given
Drop: 9mm

Reasons to buy

+
Stability features aren’t overbearing
+
Light for a stability shoe
+
Good for wide feet

Reasons to avoid

-
Firm ride
-
Rocks get stuck in outsole

Most stability shoes tip the scales at over 300g, because the extra features in the shoe that help counter overpronation often add weight. The Cloudflyer stands out as a relatively lightweight option at 291g in the men’s UK 9 we tested, and it still has a big chunk of On’s distinctive cushioning on the bottom to provide a comfortable ride. The support in the shoe isn’t overbearing either, so it’s a comfortable option for long runs. This is the third version of the Cloudflyer, and if you’re buying from an online retailer double-check you’re getting the latest edition because On doesn’t number its shoe lines.

Buy men’s from On (opens in new tab) | Buy women’s from On (opens in new tab) | £140


New Balance Fresh Foam X 860v12 stability running shoe

(Image credit: New Balance)
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New Balance Fresh Foam X 860v12

The best all-round stability shoe

Specifications

RRP: £125
Weight: 323g (UK 8.5)
Stack: 34mm heel, 24mm forefoot
Drop: 10mm

Reasons to buy

+
Subtle stability features
+
Comfortable midsole foam
+
Great grip

Reasons to avoid

-
A bit heavy for fast running

The Fresh Foam X 860v12 has a smooth and comfortable ride that works for neutral runners as well as those who overpronate. Stability features like a medial post and the moulded heel counter are enhanced by the firm feel of the foam, which also helps to counter any wobbles on the run. The outsole is impressively thick and grips well on wet roads and light trails, though it is a factor in the relatively high weight of the 860v12, which makes the shoe best suited to easy and long runs rather than anything speedy.

Buy men’s from New Balance (opens in new tab) | Buy women’s from New Balance (opens in new tab) | £125


Hoka One One Arahi 6 stability running shoe

(Image credit: Hoka)

Hoka One One Arahi 6

A lightweight stability shoe

Specifications

RRP : £125
Weight: 265g (UK 8)
Stack: 29mm heel, 24mm forefoot (mens), 27mm heel, 22mm forefoot (women’s)
Drop: 5mm

Reasons to buy

+
Lightweight
+
Good for a range of paces
+
Subtle stability features

Reasons to avoid

-
Ride might be too firm for some
-
Not as comfortable for easy runs

One of the lightest stability shoes we’ve come across, the Arahi 6 also has a firm, responsive ride that makes it a great option for faster running. The shoe uses a J-Frame in the midsole to provide stability, and has Hoka’s rocker geometry to smoothly roll you through your footstrike. Despite the high stack of cushioning, some find the Arahi too firm to use it regularly for easy and long runs, especially those who expect a similarly plush ride to Hoka’s other shoes like the Clifton or Bondi.

Buy men’s from Hoka (opens in new tab) | Buy women’s from Hoka (opens in new tab) | £125


Buying Guides

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Nike Air Zoom Structure 24

A comfortable option for daily training

Specifications

RRP: £109.95
Weight: 312g (UK 9)
Stack: 27mm heel, 19mm forefoot
Drop: 8mm

Reasons to buy

+
Stylish design
+
Smooth, comfortable ride

Reasons to avoid

-
A little heavy

The Zoom Structure is one of the more stylish stability shoes on the market, which some say shouldn’t be a key factor in a running shoe (ignore those people). The latest version of the shoe has a crash pad under the heel to cushion your landings and help guide your foot through the transition from heel to toe smoothly. 

Buy men’s from Nike (opens in new tab) | Buy women’s from Nike (opens in new tab) | £109.95


Buying Guides

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Saucony Fastwitch 9

The best stability racing shoe

Specifications

RRP: £100
Weight: 193g (UK 8)
Stack: 19mm heel, 15mm forefoot
Drop: 4mm

Reasons to buy

+
Very light for racing
+
Good value

Reasons to avoid

-
Firm ride 
-
Lacks the efficiency gains of carbon plate shoes

If you’re a committed runner building a serious collection and are happy to splash out for a pure racing shoe, the Fastwitch 9 is the best choice if you need some stability with your speedy flat. It weighs under 200g and is all about getting you to the finish line as quickly as possible. As a result its stability features aren’t as supportive as you’ll find on other training shoes in this list, and it doesn’t have much cushioning, but that’s the trade-off you make when you’re cutting weight to set some PBs. 

Buy men’s from Saucony (opens in new tab) | Buy women’s from Saucony (opens in new tab) | £100


Buying Guides

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Asics GT-1000 10

The best-value stability shoe

Specifications

RRP: £105
Weight: 277g
Stack: Not given
Drop: 8mm

Reasons to buy

+
Good value
+
High level of support
+
Lightweight

Reasons to avoid

-
Firm ride

Asics’s GT range is always worth checking out if you’re seeking stability shoes on a budget because the GT-800 and GT-1000 both offer great value and are almost always discounted somewhere. Case in point, the GT-1000 10 is currently reduced at Pro:Direct Running – the cheapest options are available for £63. The 10th edition of the shoe uses a mix of Asics’s FlyteFoam and Gel materials in the midsole, which deliver a firm and responsive ride, and the Duomax sport system uses firmer foam on the medial side to counter overpronation. 

Buy men’s from Pro:Direct Running (opens in new tab) | Buy women’s from Pro:Direct Running (opens in new tab) | £105 (currently reduced, men's from £63, women's from £73.50) 


Nike React Infinity Run 3

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Nike React Infinity Run 3

Best stable neutral shoe

Specifications

RRP: £145
Weight: 310g (UK 9)
Stack: Not given
Drop: TBC

Reasons to buy

+
Smooth and stable ride
+
Highly durable
+
Comfortable for neutral runners 

Reasons to avoid

-
Some runners will need more stability
-
Not great for speedwork

Not every runner needs a stability shoe, but almost every runner can benefit from having a touch of extra stability in their shoe at times. Stable neutral is a category that’s growing in popularity as a result, and the Nike Infinity Run 3 typifies this kind of shoe. It’s a neutral shoe with stability features like a wide base and a large plastic clip around the heel. The React foam in the midsole is also fairly firm, which helps with stability, while the rocker shape means that the ride is still comfortable for racking up the miles in training. The Infinity Run line is renowned for its durability and while the shoe is a little pricy at its full RRP, the 3 is very similar to the 2 and you could bag a bargain if you spot the previous version in a sale.

Buy men’s from Pro:Direct Running (opens in new tab) | Buy women’s from Pro:Direct Running (opens in new tab) | From £145

Nick Harris-Fry is a journalist who has been covering health and fitness since 2015. Nick is an avid runner, covering 70-110km a week, which gives him ample opportunity to test a wide range of running shoes and running gear. He is also the chief tester for fitness trackers and running watches, treadmills and exercise bikes, and workout headphones.