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Beef and potato energy stew

Beef and potato energy stew, Men's Fitness
(Image credit: Unknown)

Serves 4
Per portion: 552 calories, 55.1g protein, 13.1g fat, 48.4g carbohydrate, 0.7g salt
 
You will need
900g lean beef steak, diced
6 shallots, peeled
3 large carrots, diced 
2 sweet potatoes, peeled 
and diced 
3 parsnips, diced 
Fresh thyme
500ml cider
1tbsp Worcestershire sauce
200g 
can butterbeans
Salt and freshly ground pepper

How to make it
Preheat the oven to 150°C/Gas Mark 2. Toss the meat in the flour and place in a casserole dish with the vegetables. Add all the other ingredients, cover with a lid and cook in the oven for up to four hours.

Why should I have it?
Sweet potatoes have a low glycaemic index (GI), which means they release their energy slowly. This helps keep blood sugar levels stable and prevents energy dips (which are not something you stick your nachos in before you go running). The butterbeans boost your carbohydrate intake and supply plenty of B vitamins needed to release energy from food – they’re like magic beans, in a way. A lack of energy can sometimes be the result of a poor iron intake, and beef is one of the richest and most easily absorbed sources. It can also be the result of being a lazy bugger, in which case we suggest you get some exercise while you’re waiting for your dinner to cook.

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Dr Sarah Schenker is a dietitian, sports dietitian and public health nutritionist, who has worked with Jamie Oliver on his Feed Me Better campaign, Premiership football clubs including Chelsea FC and Tottenham Hotspur, and various government committees.


Sarah co-authored the book The Fast Diet (opens in new tab), has written other books including My Sugar Free Baby and Me and Eating Fat Will Make You Fat (opens in new tab), and has contributed to the Mail Online (opens in new tab), the Huffington Post (opens in new tab) and many others. 


Sarah is a member of the British Dietetic Association (opens in new tab), Nutrition Society (opens in new tab), Association for Nutrition (opens in new tab) and the Guild of Health Writers (opens in new tab).