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The Best Treadmills For Home

If you’re looking for ways to exercise at home, there’s a lot to recommend getting a treadmill. Whether you’re already a keen runner or are looking to exercise more regularly, having access to your own treadmill makes it that little bit easier to establish a routine.

Below you’ll find a range of great treadmills to suit every runner and walker, whether you’re looking to spend under £500 on a budget machine or have thousands to splash out on a gym-standard unit. You’ll also find a buyer’s guide with info on how to go about picking the right treadmill for you.

The Best Home Treadmills Of 2022

Opti folding treadmill

(Image credit: Opti)
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Opti Folding Treadmill

Best treadmill for walking

Specifications

RRP: £429
Max speed: 12km/h
Max incline: 6.5%
Max user weight: 100kg
Belt size (cm): 120 x 40
Size (cm): 127.2 (H), 71.7 (W), 156.7 (L)
Folding: Yes, 144.8 (H), 71.5 (W), 77.5 (L)
Connectivity: None
Motor CHP: 0.8 CHP

Reasons to buy

+
Good value
+
Small and easy to store
+
Tablet holder

Reasons to avoid

-
Low top speed
-
Incline is manual
-
Weak motor

This model from Argos has a respectable top speed of 12km/h, but will struggle to run at that pace for too long because of the small 0.8CHP motor. But you can still get a great run-walk workout from a machine like this, especially as it has three manual levels of incline – 2.8%, 5% and 6.5% – which will make walking or jogging a whole lot tougher. The treadmill also has a tablet holder, so you won’t be short of entertainment during your workouts.


JLL T350 Folding Treadmill

(Image credit: JLL)
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JLL T350 Folding Treadmill

Best entry-level treadmill for beginner/intermediate runners

Specifications

RRP: £539.99
Max speed: 18km/h
Max user weight: 120kg
Max incline: Not given
Size (cm): 128 (H), 70 (W), 158 (L)
Belt size (cm): 121 x 41
Folding: Yes, 146 (H), 70 (W), 82 (L)
Connectivity: None
Motor CHP: 2.5 CHP

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent spec for the price
+
20 incline levels
+
20 preset workouts

Reasons to avoid

-
Small running belt

This is a great treadmill for beginner and intermediate runners – those who are well past the run/walk stage but don’t need to splash out on a semi-commercial machine with a seriously challenging top speed. The T350 still goes as fast as 18km/h (a pace of 3min 20sec/km), which will be more than enough for most, and it offers 20 levels of incline too. The 121cm x 41cm belt will accommodate most runners, and there are 20 preset workout programmes you can try.


DKN EzRun treadmill

(Image credit: DKN)
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DKN EzRun

A good-value treadmill with a high top speed

Specifications

RRP: £799
Max speed: 20km/h
Max incline: 12%
Max user weight: 130kg
Size (cm): 143 (H) x 85 (W), ‎183 (L)
Belt size (cm): 140 x 52
Folding: Yes, 159 (H) x 85 (W) x 116 (L)
Connectivity: Via Bluetooth to apps and HRM
Motor CHP: 1.75 CHP

Reasons to buy

+
Relatively affordable
+
High top speed of 20km/h
+
Can connect to Kinomap app

Reasons to avoid

-
Small running belt
-
1.75CHP motor is weaker than others

We’ve tested and loved the DKN EnduRun, which is the more expensive model in this range, but the EzRun will easily fulfil the needs of most runners and it’s much cheaper. The EzRun has an impressive speed range that runs up to 20km/h and the incline range tops out at 12%. At 140cm long, the running belt is smaller than on the EnduRun, and the 1.75CHP motor is weaker, but both will suffice unless you’re especially tall or fast enough to spend long periods running at near the max speed (which translates to a pace of 3min/km). The EzRun can also connect to the Kinomap app via Bluetooth, which is a bonus on a machine that costs less than £1,000.


JTX Sprint-5 treadmill

(Image credit: JTX)
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JTX Sprint-5

Best treadmill for new runners

Specifications

RRP: £829
Max speed: 18 km/h
Max incline: 10%
Max user weight: 120kg
Size (cm): 157 (H), 83 (W), 174 (L)
Belt size (cm): 140 x 48
Folding: Yes, 157 (H), 83 (W), 114 (L)
Connectivity: Connects to apps via Bluetooth, compatible with Polar HRM
Motor CHP: 2.5 CHP

Reasons to buy

+
Under £1,000
+
Connects to Kinomap app
+
Links to Polar heart rate monitors

Reasons to avoid

-
Small running belt

There’s a cheaper entry-level model from JTX, but we think it’s worth paying more for the extra connectivity this model provides. It can connect to the Kinomap app (subscription required) so you can run real-world routes, with the app automatically adjusting the incline to match what’s on screen. Even better is the ability to connect to a Polar heart rate monitor (sold separately; we recommend the H9 (opens in new tab)) so you can add heart rate training to your repertoire – a very valuable addition.


JTX Sprint-7 treadmillEditor’s Choice 2020 Award Logo

(Image credit: JTX)
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The best home treadmill under £1,000

Specifications

RRP: £979
Max speed: 20km/h
Max incline: 12%
Max user weight: 130kg
Size (cm): 159 (H), 88 (W), 179 (L)
Belt size (cm): 145 x 51
Folding: Yes, 159 (H), 88 (W), 120 (L)
Connectivity: Connects to apps via Bluetooth, compatible with Polar HRM
Motor: 3HP

Reasons to buy

+
Powerful 3HP motor
+
High max speed and incline
+
Connects to Kinomap app

Reasons to avoid

-
No Zwift connectivity

If your budget for a home treadmill is £1,000, this excellent machine is almost certainly your best bet. The speed range of up to 20km/h is equivalent to commercial machines, while the incline goes up to 12%. We found that even when running for long periods at high paces the belt ran smoothly and the machine was easy to assemble, though having an extra person on hand is vital to get the heavy base in position. 

The JTX Sprint-7 doesn’t have some of the bells and whistles you get on more expensive treadmills, such as Zwift connectivity, but it does connect to the Kinomap app and it will serve all your running needs very well even if you’re an experienced runner (our tester with a 2hr 29min marathon PB trained on it happily) and we found the belt was spacious enough for a 1.8m (6ft) tall runner.

Get more details from our JTX Sprint-7 review


ProForm Power 995i Treadmill

(Image credit: ProForm)
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ProForm Power 995i Treadmill

A great treadmill for faster runners

Specifications

RRP: £1,199
Max speed: 22km/h
Max incline: 12%
Max user weight: 135kg
Size (cm): 169 (H), 91 (W), 207 (L)
Belt size (cm): 152 x 51
Folding: Yes, 182 (H), 91 (W), 101 (L)
Connectivity: Connects to the iFit app, HRM compatible
Motor CHP: 3 CHP

Reasons to buy

+
Powerful 3CHP motor
+
High max speed of 22km/h
+
Connects to iFit app

Reasons to avoid

-
No Zwift connectivity

The Power 995i is an impressive machine with a spec to please runners of all levels. The speed tops out at 22km/h and the incline goes up to 12%, and with a powerful 3CHP motor the machine will run smoothly even if you’re accomplished enough to run near the top of those ranges. The running deck also folds up and it can be wheeled out of the way.

The Power 995i can connect to the iFit app where you’ll find guided workouts to help you vary your training (iFit membership is required – a one-year subscription is included with the treadmill), and there’s a tablet holder on the console.


DKN EnduRun treadmillEditor’s Choice 2021 Award Logo

(Image credit: DKN)
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Best treadmill under £1,500

Specifications

RRP: £1,349
Max speed: 22km/h
Max incline: 15%
Max user weight: 150kg
Size (cm): 157 (H), 89.5 (W), 206.5 (L)
Belt size (cm): 151 x 53
Folding: Yes, 162 x (H) 89.5 (W) x 139 (L)
Connectivity: Connects to apps
Motor CHP: 2.5 CHP

Reasons to buy

+
Large running belt
+
High max speed and incline
+
Connects to Kinomap app

Reasons to avoid

-
No built-in screen

The EnduRun offers a gym-standard experience thanks to its sizeable 151cm x 53cm running belt, high top speed of 22km/h, powerful 2.5CHP motor, and easy-to-use console that includes buttons to take you directly to certain levels of speed or inclines. You can also adjust these using handily placed buttons on the sides of the machine, which are easier to use while running.

It can also connect directly to Kinomap and the ledge on the console is well placed so you can rest your tablet there without obscuring the EnduRun’s display. When we reviewed the treadmill we were also able to connect it directly to Zwift easily, but it’s now not listed as Zwift compatible, so that might no longer be the case.

There are 27 workout modes on the machine, several of which can be configured by the user, but the connectivity to apps means you’ll be able to access far more immersive guided workouts that way, even if the preset options are handy in a pinch.

Get more details in our DKN EnduRun Treadmill review


Echelon Stride treadmill

(Image credit: Echelon)
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An affordable Peloton alternative

Specifications

RRP: £1,599
Max speed: 19km/h
Max incline: 10%
Max user weight: 136kg
Size (cm): 125 (H), 79 (W), 176 (L)
Belt size (cm): 139.7 x 50.8
Folding: Yes, 176 (H), 79 (W), 26 (L)
Connectivity: Connects to Echelon app
Motor CHP: 1.75 CHP

Reasons to buy

+
Folds down flat
+
Partner app with guided workouts

Reasons to avoid

-
No built-in screen
-
Poor specs for price
-
Subscription is expensive

The Stride connects to the Echelon app where you’ll find enough live and on-demand guided classes to last you a lifetime. The treadmill has a top speed of 19km/h and the incline goes up to 10%, with a 1.75CHP motor under the hood. The guided workouts are the key selling point of the Stride (the app subscription costs £25-£39.99 a month, depending on the length of contract), but another major plus of the machine is that it folds up to just 26cm thick and 176cm tall, making it easier to tuck out of the way when not in use.

The size of the running belt, power of the motor and top speed all make the Stride a little under-specced for the price, but it still performed well when we tested it out, and the small size when folded adds to its appeal significantly. It also works well as a general treadmill even if you have no plans to use the Echelon app, though if you are going to do that there’s better value for money to be found in the JTX or DKN machines.

Get more details in our Echelon Stride review


Peloton TreadEditor’s Choice 2022

The Peloton Tread treadmill in our reviewer’s garage. (Image credit: Nick Harris-Fry / Future)
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Best treadmill for guided workouts

Specifications

RRP: £2,295
Max speed: 20km/h
Max incline: 12.5%
Max user weight: 136kg
Size (cm): 157 (H), 84 (W), 173 (L)
Belt size (cm): 150 x 50
Folding: No
Connectivity: WiFi ANT+ wireless, access to Peloton live classes
Motor: 3.0 HP DC

Reasons to buy

+
Roomy running belt
+
Enjoyable guided workouts
+
Vast screen

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive and continuing subscription cost
-
Can’t use other apps
-
Doesn’t fold

Peloton began with a wildly successful spin bike and glossy subscription app, and it applies that format to indoor running. The treadmill has a huge 23.8in (60.5cm) HD screen on the console that streams an inexhaustible supply of guided workouts as well as scenic runs in exotic locations, which look stunning on the screen. You control the speed and incline on the treadmill by twirling two knobs on the sides of the machine, and it maxes out at 20km/h and a 12% incline.

The main reason to get the machine is of course the extra motivation of the live and on-demand workouts, but it’s also a high-end bit of kit in general, with a slatted belt that gives a more realistic running feel. Of course, this all comes at a cost: the treadmill will set you back £2,295 with a further £39 a month for a subscription to the app.

It’s also worth making you aware that the Peloton Tread was recalled in the UK in May 2021. According to Peloton’s safety notice, “in a small number of cases, the touchscreen may become loose and fall off, posing a risk of injury”. It is back on sale now and includes some extra safety features to make sure it can be switched on only by an adult.

Get more details in our Peloton Tread review


TreadmillEditor’s Choice 2021 Award Logo

The Technogym MyRun treadmill in our reviewer’s garage. (Image credit: Author’s own)
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Best connected treadmill

Specifications

RRP: £3,450
Max speed: 20km/h
Max incline: 12%
Max user weight: 140kg
Size (cm): 126 (H), 78.5 (W), 176 (L)
Belt size (cm): 143 x 50
Folding: No
Connectivity: Technogym Live app
Motor: 3.0 CHP

Reasons to buy

+
Partner app with guided workouts
+
Can stream third-party apps like Netflix
+
Links to Zwift
+
Smaller footprint than other high-end treadmills

Reasons to avoid

-
Running belt smaller than on rivals
-
No built-in screen

It may be expensive, but if you have the money the Technogym MyRun offers the most complete indoor running experience we’ve tried. The impressive hardware includes a 3.0CHP motor, a top speed of 20km/h and an incline range that goes up to 12%. Despite being a compact machine that doesn’t dominate a room, it also has a large 143 x 50cm running belt that accommodated a 183cm-tall runner easily in our testing.

What really sets the MyRun apart is the range of features in the partner app, Technogym Live. These include guided workouts with instructors and interval sessions where the machine’s speed and incline settings are changed automatically, so you can run them in the background while you watch one of the streaming services you can access in the Technogym app, like Netflix and YouTube. It costs £8.99 a month to get full access to the app – but you’ll find more than enough classes to keep you busy on the free option.

technogym-myrun-treadmill-studio-photograph-live-interface

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You can also easily connect the MyRun to Zwift, and pair it with your Strava to recreate your outdoor runs indoors. It’s an extremely smart machine, and all the options it offers will make your training more engaging and help to keep you coming back for more.

Get more details in our TechnoGym MyRun review


best-treadmills-nordictrack-commercial-x22i

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NordicTrack Commercial X22i

Best treadmill for hill training

Specifications

RRP: £3,999
Max speed: 22km/h
Max incline: 40%
Max user weight: 135kg
Size (cm) : 184 (H), 100 (W), 179 (L)
Belt size (cm) : 152 x 55
Folding : No
Connectivity : iFIT integrated, Bluetooth
Motor : 4CHP

Reasons to buy

+
Incline range of -6% to 40%
+
Built-in screen
+
iFit compatibility

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive
-
Doesn’t link to Zwift

NordicTrack has done a great job of integrating the iFit app and its guided workouts across its own range of cardio machines. With the Commercial X22i you’re getting a 22in (56cm) touchscreen on the console to stream iFit workouts, and the app will automatically adjust the treadmill’s speed, incline and decline according to the instructor’s demands. You get a one-year iFit membership included with the machine (it’s £129 a year thereafter) and the workouts cover yoga, strength and Pilates sessions as well as running.

The Commercial X22i is also just a great treadmill, even if you never intend to use the iFit app. The incline range is vast, extending from a 6% decline up to 40% incline, with a top speed of 22km/h, while a 4CHP motor ensures the belt runs smoothly even if you plan to run at 22km/h on a 40% slope. Good luck.

Treadmill Buyer’s Guide

There is a wide variety of consumer treadmills to consider, at a range of prices that stretch from £250 up to, well, pretty much any number you can think of. The key benefit of spending more is the upgrade to a more powerful motor, which allows the machine to run more smoothly at a higher speed for longer. The number to look for and compare across models is CHP, or continuous horse power – plain HP represents peak power and is less relevant to everyday use.

An increasingly common feature on treadmills is Bluetooth connectivity. While this is available across the price spectrum, it is more likely to appear on more expensive machines. The benefit is that Bluetooth treadmills can sync to companion or third-party apps which provide more workouts to follow and make the experience much more engaging. Bluetooth connectivity isn’t essential, but we expect it will become a standard feature in the near future.

By spending more you’ll also get a higher top speed, a greater incline range and more preset training programmes, along with a larger running deck, which can be crucial if you’re 1.78m (5ft 10in) or taller, because cheaper machines might well force you to shorten your stride. 

Once you get into the premium treadmill range of above £1,000 you’ll also start to get fancier features like the ability to connect to apps which offer more compelling preset workouts and can guide your training in the long term. Above £2,000 you should expect large built-in HD touchscreens, although often what you’re paying for is a commercial-grade machine that can handle multiple runners pounding away for most of the day. Unless you live with an extended family of keen runners, a cheaper model may well suffice.

However much you plan to spend on a treadmill, it’s vital to consider how much space you have for it. Some machines have folding designs – you will either be able to lift the belt up or bring the console down so it folds flat – which can make it easier to store in between runs. 

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