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The Best Smart Scales To Track Weight, BMI, Body Fat Percentage And More

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(Image credit: Unknown)

Traditionally, people would buy a set of bathroom scales when they were about to embark on a weight-loss kick. Since losing weight in the long term is far trickier than anyone wants it to be, the scale often becomes the most resented item in a house – Joe Wicks has even dubbed it “the sad step”. 

The smart scales of today, however, go well beyond basic weight measurements and can be useful even if losing weight has never crossed your mind. Many of these modern marvels can measure body fat and some can tell you how much of your body is muscle, water and bone. They can even recognise which member of your household is stepping on the scale and beam your results to an app.

Keeping an eye on those things can be useful in a number of scenarios beyond knowing if your weight is trending up over time. Or indeed down, because rapid weight loss can be a sign of illness, or that you’re underfuelling (when we interviewed Ali Nolan about women and marathon training, she mentioned that women often don’t consume enough calories to support their training). Knowing if you have a healthy body fat percentage can also help you from falling foul of the problems with BMI.

When deciding on a smart scale, it’s worth considering whether you own, or plan to buy, a fitness tracker. All the major manufacturers make smart scales and combining your health data into one app is much more convenient. With the limitations of Fitbit’s current scale offering, you may wish to shop for another of our best fitness trackers

The Best Smart Scales

Renpho Smart Body Fat Scale

(Image credit: Camilla Artault / Future)
The cheapest option

Specifications

RRP: £29.99
Measurements given: Weight, BMI, body fat, water, skeletal muscle, muscle mass, bone mass, protein, basal metabolic rate, subcutaneous fat, visceral fat, metabolic age
Connectivity: Connects via Bluetooth to Renpho app, compatible with Apple, Samsung, Fitbit and Google health apps

Reasons to buy

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Tracks all body composition stats
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Compatible with Apple and Android health apps
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Cheaper than rival smart scales

Reasons to avoid

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Bluetooth connection requires you to have your phone nearby

It seems unnecessary to pay £120 for a smart scale when this Renpho model offers all the same features and is available for less than £30. It connects to a phone via Bluetooth and uploads your body composition stats to the Renpho app, allowing you to track them over time. The app is compatible with Apple Health, Fitbit, Google Fit and Samsung Health, so you can build a detailed picture of your health. An unlimited number of users can create profiles and log their data, and there’s an Athlete Mode, too. Renpho also offers a more expensive WiFi version, if connecting your phone to the Bluetooth seems like too much of a faff.

Read about our experience with the best smart scale under £30 in our Renpho scale review


Withings Body Cardio smart scales

(Image credit: Withings)
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Withings Body Cardio

Body composition info from one of the most advanced consumer health tech companies

Specifications

RRP: £129.95
Measurements given: Weight, BMI, body fat, water, bone mass, muscle mass and cardiovascular health
Connectivity: WiFi connection, compatible with Fitbit, Apple and Google devices

Reasons to buy

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Gives all body composition stats and BMI
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Measures heart health 
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Plays nice with Fitbit, Apple and Google devices
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Impressive app

Reasons to avoid

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Expensive
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Spotty heart health readings 

The Withings Body Cardio does something no other scale does. On top of providing all your body composition stats – weight, body fat, BMI, water percentage and muscle and bone mass – it gives a picture of your heart health as well. However, we found it very hit and miss, so we wouldn’t spend the extra money on account of that. 

It tracks everything else reliably and Withings offers a slick ecosystem, with a range of excellent fitness trackers and smartwatches – we recommend the ScanWatch – and other devices like home blood pressure monitors. Uniquely, the scale also plays nice with Fitbit, Apple’s Health Kit and Google Fit, thereby providing an alternative for Fitbit users and an option for Apple Watch or Wear OS smartwatch owners.


Fitbit Aria smart scales

(Image credit: Fitbit)
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Fitbit Aria Air

Budget smart scale that tracks weight and BMI

Specifications

RRP: £49.99
Measurements given: Weight, BMI (though app)
Connectivity: Connects via Bluetooth to Fitbit app and devices

Reasons to buy

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Multi-user weight tracking
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Calculates BMI through the app
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Cheaper than most smart scales
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Connects via Bluetooth to Fitbit app and devices

Reasons to avoid

-
Doesn’t offer body composition stats

If you’re unconcerned with your body fat percentage, or don’t think it’s worth stumping up three figures to get it, this smaller set of scales from Fitbit strips away features to provide a budget option. You’ll get your weight, and it’ll send it to the app over Bluetooth where your BMI will be calculated and graphed.


Garmin index smart scales

(Image credit: Garmin)
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Garmin Index S2 Smart Scale

Convenient body composition tracking for Garmin users

Specifications

RRP: £129.99
Measurements given: Weight, BMI, body fat percentage, skeletal muscle mass, bone mass, body water percentage
Connectivity: Connects via WiFi to Garmin app and devices

Reasons to buy

+
Gives all body composition stats and BMI
+
Links with activity and sleep tracking
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Multi-user function
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Customisable display

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive
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Non-Garmin users will find better value elsewhere

As with Fitbit’s smart scales, the appeal of the Garmin Index S2 is that it’s the easiest way for owners of Garmin (opens in new tab) fitness wearables to add information about their weight to other health data in the Garmin Connect app. However, unlike the Fitbit Aria Air, the Garmin Index S2 measures your body composition as well as your headline weight.

The Index S2 works out your body fat percentage, skeletal muscle mass, bone mass and body water percentage, and it connects to the Garmin Connect app over Wi-Fi. Once the data is in there, you can view trends in your stats and see how they relate to your activity and sleep. That’s assuming you are also using a Garmin wearable to monitor those areas – if not, there are better-value options for you on this list.


best smart scales huawei

(Image credit: Unknown)
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Huawei Smart Scale

Great-value smart scale that tracks all the essential stats

Specifications

RRP: £69.99
Measurements given: Weight, body fat, visceral fat, muscle mass, bone mass
Connectivity: WiFi and Bluetooth, connects to app

Reasons to buy

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Displays weight and body fat percentage
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App shows body composition stats
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Much cheaper than rival smart scales

Reasons to avoid

-
Not as accurate as some

Huawei (along with sub-brand Honor) has moved into health tech with great-value fitness trackers, like the Huawei Band, and fitness smartwatches, such as the impressive Huawei Watch GT 2e (opens in new tab). It continues in the same vein with this smart scale, which offers the full suite of measurements – weight, body fat, visceral fat, muscle mass, bone mass and more – for much less moolah. The scale looks slick and, while there’s no noticeable screen, numbers will appear when you step on the plate. It can automatically recognise up to ten different people and an alarm can be set to help you weigh yourself at a consistent time. While it is much cheaper on Amazon, it’s worth checking the Huawei website because it has been bundled with a free fitness tracker in the past, giving you a great starter set-up.


Myzone smart scale

(Image credit: Myzone)
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Myzone MZ-20 Home Scale

Screenless smart scale with stats viewable in the app

Specifications

RRP: £59.99
Measurements given: Weight, body fat, muscle mass, visceral fat, basal metabolic rate
Connectivity: Links to Myzone app via Bluetooth

Reasons to buy

+
Measures weight and body composition
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Estimates basal metabolic rate
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Visceral fat readings

Reasons to avoid

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No screen – all results displayed via the app

Link this scale to the Myzone app and if you also use the company’s chest strap heart rate monitor, you’ll have your weight and all your workouts in one place. Not just your weight, of course – the MZ-20 scale will also provide your body fat percentage and muscle mass, so you can see how your training sessions are affecting your body composition.

On top of these key stats, you also get visceral fat readings and an estimate of your basal metabolic rate – the amount of energy your body uses when at rest – which gives you a clearer picture of the calories you burn each day than you would get just from looking at those burned during exercise. The scale runs on batteries and comes in two colours – white and black, nothing too funky on that front. There’s also no screen so you’ll need your phone to hand every time you weigh yourself.


Tanita smart scale

(Image credit: Tania)
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Tanita BC-731

Good-value option with a small footprint

Specifications

RRP: £55
Measurements given: Weight, body fat, muscle mass, BMI, visceral fat, metabolic age, physique rating
Connectivity: None

Reasons to buy

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Great value
+
Gives weight, BMI and body composition
+
Estimates visceral fat
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Save up to five profiles

Reasons to avoid

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No app – tracking is shown on the scales
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Doesn’t fit large feet

Although it’s less than half the price of some options on this list, the Tanita BC-731 offers all the body composition stats you’d hope for, including weight, body fat, muscles mass and BMI. It also goes beyond other scales in giving a visceral fat estimate (the more dangerous fat that builds up around your organs), your metabolic age and even a physique rating based on all of the above. It won’t send those results to a partner app but does allow for up to five user profiles to be saved on the scales.

Nick Harris-Fry is a journalist who has been covering health and fitness since 2015. Nick is an avid runner, covering 70-110km a week, which gives him ample opportunity to test a wide range of running shoes and running gear. He is also the chief tester for fitness trackers and running watches, treadmills and exercise bikes, and workout headphones.

With contributions from