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Are fitness DVDs for men actually any good?

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Infomercials for American home workout DVDs are some of our favourite adverts. Whether they’re terrifying, bizarre or genuinely motivational, they’re always entertaining. But are the products they promote actually any good for improving your fitness? We’re going to find out by getting our new feature writer Richard Jordan to test a load of them, starting with…

8 minute abs? 7 minute biceps? Click here to find out if this is even possible with the P90X workout video - discover how you can get fit with the 90-day blitz of dumbbell moves, plyometrics and martial arts moves

Hip-hop Abs (opens in new tab)

A dance-based programme that promises to help you build a six-pack without a single crunch. However, you will do lots of running man-style moves so you’ll probably want to wait until everyone in your house is out and pull the curtains before you start.

The Insanity Workout (opens in new tab)

A tub-thumping 60-day video workout programme created by personal trainer Shaun T that relies on high-intensity interval training to get you lean and help you pack on muscle. Everyone in the advert looks like they’re on speed, but that could just be because of the masses of endorphins the workout pumps around your system. Find out more with our Insanity workout review.

Georges St-Pierre’s RUSHFIT (opens in new tab)

UFC middleweight champion Georges St-Pierre takes you through a series of intense total-body workouts that incorporate freeweights and lots of MMA-style moves with the aim of giving you a fighter’s physique. Since there’s no sparring you won’t end up with the broken-nosed look – just Octagon-worthy abs, it claims.

We're looking for more to try to so if you have any more suggestions, please email Richard at richard_jordan@dennis.co.uk (opens in new tab)

Nick Hutchings worked for Men’s Fitness UK, which predated, and then shared a website with, Coach. Nick worked as digital editor from 2008 to 2011, head of content until 2014, and finally editor-in-chief until 2015.