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The Best Spin Bikes For Home Training

Peloton Bike
If you want the best spin bike for home, Peloton still reigns supreme (Image credit: Peloton)

Spinning is an efficient and pretty enjoyable way to get fit, and while using a home spin bike can’t completely recreate the atmosphere of a studio class full of fellow riders, it’s still a great way to exercise at home – and over time it can save you money if it means you avoid regularly shelling out for expensive classes in boutique gyms.

If you look at our round-up of the best exercise bikes you’ll see that spinning at home requires a certain kind of bike, which is called an indoor cycle. These provide a different riding position from upright exercise bikes – you’ll be leaning forwards as on a racing bike – and they are better at mimicking the feel of outdoor cycling.

We’ve picked the best home spinning bikes to suit a range of budgets below, and you’ll also find a buyer’s guide to help you narrow down your choice.

The Best Spin Bikes Of 2022

JLL IC200 Pro spin bike

(Image credit: JLL)
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JLL IC200 Pro

Best budget home spinning bike

Specifications

RRP: £249.99
Flywheel weight: 7kg
Size (cm): 55.5 (H), 122.5 (W), 119.5 (L)
Max user weight: 100kg
Connectivity: None

Reasons to buy

+
Great value
+
Light and portable
+
Adjustable saddle and handlebars

Reasons to avoid

-
Only eight levels of resistance
-
7kg flywheel is fairly light
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No connectivity features

This is a great pick for beginners or anyone working to a tight budget. The IC200 Pro has a 7kg flywheel and offers eight levels of resistance, with the highest ones providing a challenge to even intermediate riders. There’s a tablet holder on the console too, so you can load up video workouts from apps or YouTube. If you want more resistance and have a little more budget to play with, check out the JLL indoor cycle range (opens in new tab).


JTX Cyclo-3 spin bike

(Image credit: JTX)
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JTX Cyclo-3

Best spinning bike under £500

Specifications

RRP: £389
Flywheel weight: 17kg
Size (cm): 101 (H), 51 (W), 120 (L)
Max user weight: 140kg
Connectivity: None

Reasons to buy

+
Great value
+
Infinite resistance
+
20kg flywheel

Reasons to avoid

-
No connectivity features

With a 17kg flywheel, the Cyclo-3 provides a tough workout for all abilities. JTX does offer more expensive models that have heavier flywheels and connectivity with training apps, but the Cyclo-3 is a great-value option for anyone who just wants a simple spinning bike they can use to get fit. 


ProForm TDF CBC spin bike

(Image credit: ProForm)
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ProForm TDF CBC

Best connected spinning bike under £1,000

Specifications

RRP: £699, app subscription £11.60 a month
Flywheel weight: 10kg
Size (cm): 127 (H), 56 (W), 126 (L)
Max user weight: 115kg
Connectivity: Links to iFit app

Reasons to buy

+
Links to iFit app
+
Cheaper than most connected bikes

Reasons to avoid

-
Only 16 levels of resistance
-
No built-in screen
-
Fairly low max user weight

This bike links to the iFit (opens in new tab) app via Bluetooth to offer a similar experience to spinning giants like Peloton at a much lower price. You’ll need your own tablet to view the app, and you can mount that tablet on the console to view the vast range of guided workouts and other engaging forms of in-ride entertainment in the iFit app. Access to the app is included for 30 days, and after that membership costs £11.60 a month. The CBC bike has 16 levels of magnetic resistance, and the iFit app can control the resistance automatically during guided workouts.


Echelon Connect Sport spin bike

(Image credit: Echelon)
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Echelon Connect Sport Bike

A Peloton alternative for under £1,000

Specifications

RRP: £799.99, app subscription £39.99 a month
Flywheel weight: 7kg
Size (cm): 126 (H), 515 (W), 96 (L)
Max user weight: 136kg
Connectivity: Connects to Echelon app and HRM

Reasons to buy

+
Connects to partner app for workouts
+
Cheaper than many spinning bikes
+
Tablet holder on handlebars

Reasons to avoid

-
No built-in screen
-
Monthly sub is expensive

The closest you’ll get to the Peloton experience for under £1,000, the Connect Sport links up to the Echelon app (£40 a month) for live and on-demand classes you can follow on a smartphone or tablet mounted on the handlebars. The Connect Sport is the cheapest bike in the Echelon range; the other options are the EX3, with a heavier flywheel and clip-in pedals that make it a better pick for experienced riders, and the EX-5S and EX-7S, which both have built-in screens.


Apex Bike

(Image credit: Apex)
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Another affordable Peloton alternative

Specifications

RRP: £599, monthly unlimited classes £30
Flywheel weight: 4kg
Size (cm): 122 (H), 61 (W), 122 (L)
Max user weight: 140kg
Connectivity: Connects to Apex App (iOS users only)

Reasons to buy

+
Connects to partner app for workouts
+
Easy to move bike around
+
Cheaper than many home spinning options

Reasons to avoid

-
Lightweight flywheel
-
No built-in screen
-
App less impressive than rivals

With this British rival to Peloton you save on both the cost of the bike and the subscription to the app, which is £30 a month rather than the £40 you pay for Peloton or Echelon’s services (it is iOS only, though). The bike has a tablet holder and a handy phone holder – which also wirelessly charges your phone – to follow the classes on. The flywheel may be light at just 4kg, but the bike still offers a fairly smooth ride at high speeds, and there are 30 levels of magnetic resistance controlled by a dial on the frame. The RRP of the bike has been slashed in 2022 from £1,200 to £599. 

Read more in our Apex Bike review


Echelon EX-3 Smart Connect Bike

(Image credit: Echelon)
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A great home spinning bike with partner app

Specifications

RRP : £1,238.99, app subscription £39.99 a month
Flywheel weight: 13kg
Size (cm): 140 (H), 51 (W), 140 (L)
Max user weight: 136kg
Connectivity: Connects to Echelon app and HRM

Reasons to buy

+
Connects to partner app for workouts
+
Cheaper than Peloton
+
Enough resistance to challenge all users

Reasons to avoid

-
No built-in screen
-
Expensive monthly sub

If you’re reading this article, you’re probably aware of Peloton, and we’re going to come onto that in a moment. But first, a cheaper alternative that offers a similar experience. The Echelon bike is linked to the Echelon app, which contains a vast amount of live and on-demand spinning classes (as well as other types of classes like yoga and strength workouts). Unlike the Peloton, there is no monitor on the Echelon bike, but you can attach a tablet to the console to follow the classes on the app. Subscription costs £39.99 a month, so consider if you’re happy committing to that, because although the Echelon bike is cheaper than the Peloton it’s still very expensive and without the app it’s pretty pointless.

Read more in our Echelon review


Peloton Bike

(Image credit: Peloton)
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Best home spinning bike

Specifications

RRP: £1,350, monthly unlimited classes £39
Flywheel weight: 18kg
Size (cm): 135 (H), 58 (W), 149 (L)
Max user weight: 135kg
Connectivity: Bluetooth, WiFi, ANT+ wireless, uses Peloton app

Reasons to buy

+
Built-in HD screen
+
Enjoyable workouts in partner app
+
Cheapest Peloton option

Reasons to avoid

-
Still expensive
-
Can’t connect to third-party apps

The bike that has become synonymous with home spinning, Peloton offers a truly excellent all-round experience. The bike itself is an impressive bit of kit, with a solid build, a quiet ride and all the resistance you could ever need. You need the monthly-subscription app to make it worthwhile, but the live and on-demand classes really do deliver the feel of a studio session. If you want to bring the spinning experience to your home there is no better option, but it comes at a hefty cost: the bike will set you back almost £2k and the subscription £39 a month. If your budget will stretch beyond that, Peloton also offers the Bike+, which costs £2,250 and has a few upgrades on the original Bike like a bigger screen and auto flow resistance, which means it will rise and fall in line with the instructions in the classes.

Read more in our Peloton review


Technogym Bike

(Image credit: Technogym)
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Best all-round exercise bike for spinning

Specifications

RRP: £2,990, monthly membership £29
Flywheel weight: 17.4kg
Size (cm): 138.2 (H), 58.9 (W), 121.4 (L)
Max user weight: 160kg
Connectivity: Apps and streaming, WiFi and Bluetooth

Reasons to buy

+
Built-in HD screen
+
Enjoyable workouts
+
Screen can use apps like Netflix

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive
-
Can’t connect to Zwift

As one of the biggest names in cardio machines Technogym will no doubt have viewed the popularity of relative upstarts like Peloton with interest, and it has now responded with a spinning bike that offers the most impressive alternative to Peloton we’ve come across.

The Technogym Bike has a 22in (56cm) HD touchscreen on the handlebars, where you can take part in live spinning classes streamed from London studio 1Rebel or Milan studio Revolution if you pay the £29 monthly subscription. However, if you don’t, you still get access to Technogym’s library of on-demand spinning workouts, which we found pretty much as good as live studio sessions.

Technogym has also made access to the bike’s screen impressively open: not only can you use popular apps like Netflix on it, but you can even plug in a Chromecast and stream content from your other devices. In short, you’ll never have to cycle without some form of guided class or entertainment being broadcast on the large, immersive screen, and you get that for less than the £39 a month you have to pay with Peloton.

Read more in our Technogym Bike review


Digme At Home Bike

(Image credit: Digme)
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Home spinning classes with a communal feel

Specifications

RRP: £1,550, app subscription £30 a month
Flywheel weight: 3.6kg
Size (cm): 112 (H), 66 (W), 130 (L)
Max user weight: 136kg
Connectivity: Bluetooth connected, uses Digme At Home app

Reasons to buy

+
Zoom classes give more communal feel
+
Smooth, quiet ride

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive, complicated membership
-
No built-in screen
-
Less slick than Technogym, Peloton, Echelon and others

London boutique gym Digme launched its At Home service during the COVID-19 lockdowns, and it proved popular enough to be kept on even after the chain’s eight studios reopened. The service involves a monthly fee to hire a bike and access the Digme At Home app, which contains a library of on-demand workouts plus a daily schedule of live classes to join.

The bike is the excellent Keiser m3i Lite, a studio-quality bit of kit with a hefty flywheel that runs smoothly and quietly no matter how hard you’re pushing. The classes are typical spinning fare, but the live sessions are a Zoom call with just a handful of other people – which does make them feel more engaging and personal than, say, Peloton’s live classes, which draw especially huge audiences.

As with other spinning services, Digme At Home does not come cheap, and the process of signing up is complicated by the excessive number of options. You pay a monthly fee (from £39 with a 36-month contract) to rent the bike, plus £30 for the app subscription, then there are other fees like delivery and collection charges that come and go depending on the length of the contract. The simplest option is to buy the bike for £1,799, and in doing so you’ll get a 12-month subscription to the app thrown in. Simple, if you have two grand to hand.

Read more in our Digme At Home review


Wahoo KICKR BIKE

(Image credit: Wahoo)
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Best spinning bike for serious cyclists

Specifications

RRP: £2,999.99
Flywheel weight: 5.9kg
Size (cm): 121 (L), 76 (W), 119 (H)
Max user weight: 113kg
Connectivity: ANT+ FEC and Bluetooth, Wahoo Fitness app

Reasons to buy

+
Connects easily to Zwift and other apps
+
Realistic ride feel
+
Can tilt forwards and backwards

Reasons to avoid

-
No tablet or phone mount
-
Very expensive
-
Guided training sessions less engaging than classes

The priciest bike on this list, but for very different reasons to the Peloton. The Wahoo KICKR BIKE is all about creating the most realistic ride feel possible, to the point where it has adjustable points all over the frame so you can set it up exactly like your road bike, and even enter your gearset details to mimic your real-world ride. The KICKR BIKE also links easily to apps like Zwift and TrainerRoad and will not only simulate the inclines you experience when riding in virtual worlds but also tip you forwards and backwards in line with the slope you’re cycling on. It’s a masterpiece of design, and the perfect bike for serious cyclists who want the best recreation of outdoor cycling possible when training indoors. For everyone else, it’s overkill of course – but what glorious overkill.

Read more in our Wahoo KICKR BIKE review

Spin Bikes Buyer’s Guide

What are the key features of home spin bikes?

Indoor cycles are generally used for HIIT sessions so you have to be sure they are sturdy enough for you to go all-out on them, with a high max user weight and stable design. You also need enough resistance to challenge yourself during short sprints. The weight of the flywheel is important for all this, and in general a heavier flywheel creates a smoother ride when working at high speeds.

If you want some guidance for your home spinning then look for smart bikes that can link up with partner apps with guided classes. Several companies like Peloton and Echelon have their own apps, but others will use third-party apps like iFit and Kinomap for classes and other in-ride entertainment. Some bikes have built-in screens to display the workouts, while others will have a tablet holder.

How much do home spin bikes cost?

You can find study indoor cycles that work for spinning for around £250-£300. These will be no-frills affairs with fairly light flywheels and limited resistance options. If you can stretch to the £500-£1,000 range your options become more impressive and varied, with heavier flywheels, more resistance and smart bikes that can connect to partner apps for guided workouts.

From there the price of an indoor cycle can rise to dizzying heights. The best connected spinning bikes with built-in screens cost anywhere from £1,000 to £2,000, and if you’re looking for an especially realistic ride experience to help you train for outdoor cycling then the bikes that do that cost £3,000.

Nick Harris-Fry is a journalist who has been covering health and fitness since 2015. Nick is an avid runner, covering 70-110km a week, which gives him ample opportunity to test a wide range of running shoes and running gear. He is also the chief tester for fitness trackers and running watches, treadmills and exercise bikes, and workout headphones.